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The Oldest Log Cabin Still Standing In America Is In New Je

This is pure American history and what makes it so intriguing is that this piece of U.S. history is right here in New Jersey. Cheapism did a recent article entitled “Fascinating Old Buildings in Every State” and it focused on American history and the landmarks we have around the nation. “The United States is a relatively young country, but it still has plenty of history to explore. And one of the best ways to trace America’s past is through its buildings, according to NetCredit, a financial-services company that compiled a list of the oldest buildings in each state. From the ancient villages of New Mexico’s Pueblo people to early Spanish settlements in Florida, these early examples of American architecture are marvels to see.”

 

 

 

 

 

According to Cheapism, the most fascinating old building in New Jersey is the C A Nothnagle Log House “Built by Finnish settlers in 1638, the Nothnagle Cabin is one of the oldest surviving log cabins in the United States. Around the fireplace, the cabin also features Scandinavian ironware that dates to the 1590s.” Think about that, ironware that’s nearly 500 years old, amazing. The cabin is located on Swedesboro-Paulsboro Road in Gibbstown, New Jersey in Gloucester County. I have visited the cabin and it is amazing to think it’s the oldest log cabin still standing in New Jersey.

 

 

According to Town and Country Magazine, “Nothnagle Cabin, in Gibbstown, New Jersey, is the oldest log cabin in the United States. Built around 1638”. If you are looking for a peek at real American history take a trip to Gibbstown and check out the C A Nothnagle Log House.

 

 

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Gallery Credit: Hannah Lang

 

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[WARNING: Under no circumstances should you enter private or abandoned property. By doing so you risk bodily harm and/or prosecution for trespassing.]

Gallery Credit: Sandi Hemmerlein

 




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